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March 2013

Get Your Easter On!

March 25, 2013 No comments

Nothing says "rabbit" like Easter, and while most people don't put bunny on their menus, there is the conundrum of what wines to imbibe with the more traditional roasted ham or a leg of lamb.

Wines for Easter
Let's start with the ham. Ham is often prepared with glazes or toppings that are sweet and can balance the inherent saltiness of the actual meat. Well paired wines can accomplish the same objective. For ham, the best "tried and true" companion wines are, hands-down – a Riesling or a Gewurztraminer. Both wines tend to offer fresh, flavorful taste profiles with enough sweet fruit to balance the salt in the ham and enough acidity to support the combination without compromising the flavor in either the ham or the wine.

Use your handy-dandy Rabbit Electra to open a bottle or two, and to keep the wine cool while the kids hunt for Easter eggs, look no further than Rabbit Wine Chilling Carafe.

If red wine is your first choice, then a Zinfandel is a perfect pick, as the higher alcohol content and fruit forward approach can handle the ham's sweeter side.

You can still use your Rabbit Electra opener, but give the Rabbit Aerating Decanter System a try. This innovative gorgeous gadget breaks red wine down into tiny droplets that spray down the side of the decanter, instantly picking up oxygen that enhances both flavor and aroma. The Super-Aerating system includes a hand-blown crystal decanter, crystal glass wine-spray funnel and super-fine sediment screen. Allowing wine time to "breathe" is now a thing of the past.

Not having ham for Easter? No problem. The trick with lamb—whether rack, leg or roast—is "to stick with your well grounded red wines - a red Burgundy, a northern Rhone red, a Cabernet Sauvignon, Malbec, Merlot or a Tempranillo or Shiraz. You are shooting for red wines with decent tannin structure, good fruit and a finish that can endure as long as the lamb itself. The goal is to have a wine with enough fruit and acidity to handle the robust flavors of the lamb, but not overpower it in the process.

Since it's a holiday, why not try the top of the line VIP Vertical Rabbit—or better idea, why not bring it as a hostess gift? The new Rabbit features all-chrome plated body with faux leather grip pad. It is housed in a hi-design storage case crafted of stainless steel and faux leather. Like all Rabbit Corkscrews, it opens a wine bottle in three seconds flat, has been tested for 20,000 cork pulls and carries a 10-Year Warranty. Metrokane offers many different Rabbit Corkscrews but only one "Super-Rabbit."

Serve the red wine via the Rabbit Aerating Pourer, which negates the need for a decanter and a separate aerator (so awkward to hold above the glass as you pour). Simply insert the Rabbit Aerating Pourer into a wine bottle as you would a conventional pourer. When you pour the wine, you see and hear aeration happening. When you taste it, you enjoy the enhanced flavor and bouquet of perfectly aerated red wine. The Rabbit Aerating pourer is the first easy, uncomplicated way to aerate wine.

Whatever wine or main course you choose, all of us at Metrokane wish you a very happy Easter!

All About Passover

March 19, 2013 No comments

We hope that everyone had a great St. Patrick's Day (even though in the East it was cold enough to freeze a leprechaun's pants off!). No matter. Spring is starting on Wednesday and we have Passover (begins Monday, 3/25) and Easter Sunday (the 31st) a little less than a week ahead.

The Passover holiday, for those of you who don't know, is a Jewish holiday commemorating the story of the Exodus, in which the ancient Israelites were freed from slavery in Egypt. The Bible states that God helped the Children of Israel escape slavery by inflicting ten plagues upon the Egyptians, the worst being the death of the first born.

The Israelites were instructed to mark the doorposts of their homes with the blood of a spring lamb and, upon seeing this, the spirit of the Lord knew to pass over the first-borns in these homes, hence the name of the holiday.

When the Pharaoh finally freed the Israelites, it is said that they left in such a hurry that they could not wait for bread dough to rise. In commemoration, no leavened bread is eaten during the seven or eight days of the holiday, which is where matzo comes in.

It is traditional for Jewish families to gather on the first or second night of Passover for a special dinner called a Seder. Tables are set with the finest china, silverware and crystal are crafted in Europe of brilliant crystal and feature elegant "pulled stems," maximum transparency and clarity) to reflect the importance of the meal. During the meal the story of the Exodus from Egypt is retold using a special text called the Haggadah. Four cups of wine are consumed at various stages in the narrative. The most popular brand, in my house, anyway, was Manischewitz, which, in order to be Kosher for Passover, is produced using real cane sugar, instead of corn syrup.

Seder not at your house this year? No problem with the Rabbit Wine Trek, which does so much more than carry white wine and champagne. The Wine Trek comes with a Chiller Wrap that is ready to use after 30 minutes in the freezer. It keeps red wine cool and drinkable too—the first-ever carrier that keeps wine and champagne cool as you "keep on trekking" (not sure about 40 days and 40 nights, though).

How to preserve the wine not used? Try a Wine Preserver Vacuum Pump with 2 Stoppers.

The Passover Seder is a special time to spend with family and friends, acknowledging blessings, eating good food and drinking good wine. What could be better than that?

March Madness

March 12, 2013 No comments

Technically, the term "March Madness" refers to the NCAA Basketball Championship, a single-elimination college basketball tournament which takes place each spring in the United States. But it could easily be applied to the weather (if you're on the East Coast, there was a snow storm on Friday, followed by temps in the 60s on Saturday), the time change (we sprang forward this past Saturday night into Sunday) and the celebration of St. Patrick's Day, which officially doesn't happen until the 17th but was nevertheless kicked off by endless parades this past weekend.

Tired yet?

My suggestion to countering all this craziness—and that's in advance of the wearing of the green—is to take it easy (as much as possible) this week. Ease into the week with a glass of wine at the end of the day (opened with your Original Rabbit Corkscrew, natch!) and perhaps a viewing of the Netflix hit, "House of Cards" (love that Kevin Spacey!).

Not into tv? How about getting a jump on your prep for corned beef and cabbage? Need an accompanying wine suggestion? Try a medium bodied red wine that is soft and fruity…and don't forget to use your Houdini Swish On-Glass Aerator!

Baking more your style? How about an Irish Soda Bread, which definitely goes better with a light, white wine (and be sure to keep it chilled in a Rabbit Wine Chilling Carafe).

In closing, try not to over drink or over eat. Remember, Easter and Passover are just around the corner!

Spring is (Finally) in the Air

March 1, 2013 No comments

Is it me? Or do the birds seem to be chirping extra loud these days? And why is the grocery store filled with Easter eggs, Irish soda bread…and matzoh? The answer is easy…spring is (finally!) in the air! (Note to people in the Northeast…we're expecting a snow storm this week).

The first holiday on the calendar is St. Patrick's Day, a cultural and religious holiday celebrated on March 17th. Named after Saint Patrick (c. AD 385–461), it was made an official feast day in the early seventeenth century. Celebrating the day usually involves parades and festivals, the wearing of green attire (Old Navy is great for t-shirts) and green beaded necklaces. It is also observed—in the US anyway—by excessive drinking (be sure to have a Rabbit Pocket Flask).

Not in the mood for green beer? (If you are, here's a recipe…12oz. beer-any beer will do, although lighter colored beers will display the green better and one drop of food coloring). How about an emerald colored cocktail, mixed up with a Rabbit Electric Cocktail Shaker?

There are many green-colored liquors, including Midori or a sour apple schnapps, or, for a stronger green tint, try green crème de menthe. Measure what you need to use with the Rabbit Double Jigger. Additional recipes can be found here: Green Cocktail Recipes.

More on St. Patrick's Day next week! But gird your loins…this is a holiday that requires a lot of stamina, especially as this year it takes place on Sunday!